MSU Denver

Philosophy at MSU Denver

“Have the courage to use your own understanding.” -Immanuel Kant

Philosophy begins in wonder. What am I? How can I know things? What is the best life for a human being? What is justice? What is truth? Philosophy is the attempt to understand and answer questions such as these in a rigorous, critical and open-ended manner. No belief is left unquestioned. No prejudice respected. No authority bowed to. Philosophy is unlike other disciplines. It is not learning what others have discovered. It is discovering how to learn, in a genuine and personal way, to use one’s own mind to think about oneself, the world and the relation between the two. Learn more about the mission and goals of the Department of Philosophy at MSU Denver.

Career Options

What can I do with a philosophy degree? A lot. Philosophy may not prepare you for one specific career, but it is particularly good at preparing students for the variety of jobs and careers graduates are likely to have over a lifetime. Philosophy majors do better, professionally and financially, than, for example, business, biology, marketing and political-science majors (don’t believe us?). And if you are considering going on to graduate school, philosophy majors score higher than any other major on the GRE and are in the top ranks for the LSAT, GMAT and MCAT. 

Already have a major? If you want to think more deeply, more critically, from different perspectives, about the things you learn in your major, the philosophy minor is for you. A philosophy minor (only 21 credits) is a great match for majors such as biology, physics, psychology, political science, sociology and anthropology. We also offer a minor in religious studies, in case you would like to critically examine the world’s various religious traditions.

Denver Project for Humanistic Inquiry

The Denver Project for Humanistic Inquiry (D-Phi) aims to enrich Denver’s intellectual and cultural life via many avenues.

D-phi

Department of Philosophy

Contact Us

Need help finding a course? Need an override or advising?

Call Us: 303-615-0900

Stop into the The Department of Philosophy in Central Classroom (CN) 303 or call 303-615-0900. We can also set up Microsoft Teams meetings as well as problem-solve over the phone.

Our physical location is open Monday-Thursday. For the time-being, on Fridays we are able to set up teams meetings and answer calls remotely.

Phone: 303-615-0900

Location: Central Building, 303

Mailing Address:

Metropolitan State University of Denver
Department of Philosophy
P.O. Box 173362, Campus Box 49
Denver, CO 80217

Faculty & Staff

Meet our Faculty
James Reid

We are excited to announce our faculty member, Dr. James Reid won a grant for the preparation of a book interpreting the work of German Romantic philosophical poet Novalis, plus a one-volume slected edition of his philsophical and literary writings from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Congratulations Dr. Reid!

Bio

Check out our Summer 2022 Classes

Image talks about PHI 3550 Existentialsm This is an eight-week summer course, so we will peruse just two seminal works by two equally important figures: Kierkegaard’s Philosophical Crumbs (1844) and Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1883-85). Both texts concern the ineluctable priority of the individual in teaching and learning. From within a revived Socratic mode, these thinkers root their written expression in story, personae, and dialogue, in a curious and singular embrace of subjectivity, irony, and negativity.

Coming this Summer 2022

PHI 3550 Existentialism
Taught by Dr. David Sullivan

This is an eight-week summer course, so we will peruse just two seminal works by two equally important figures: Kierkegaard’s Philosophical Crumbs (1844) and Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1883-85). Both texts concern the ineluctable priority of the individual in teaching and learning.From within a revived Socratic mode, these thinkers root their written expression in story, personae,and dialogue, in a curious and singular embrace of subjectivity, irony, and negativity.

S U M M E R S E M E S T E R
2 0 2 2
1 2 J U N E – 6 A U G U S T

Click on Event for more information!

04/13/2022

"What Kind of a "Virtue Ethicist" is Aristotle"

3:30-4:30

04/06/2022

"Ghosts Among Us"

12:30-1:30 SCIENCE 1117