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Spring 2020 Course Offerings

PHI 1010 - Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits) (HON 1011)
Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on the reading and writing preassessment placement tests
Description: This is a first philosophy course designed to introduce students to basic philosophical issues, primarily in the areas of metaphysics (what there is) and epistemology (how we know). This course covers fundamental questions such as, for example: “Do humans possess free will of is everything a matter of causal necessity?” or “Is there a God or an afterlife?” Important cultural achievements, in the form of original and complete works, will be emphasized.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities Guaranteed Transfer: GT-AH3
Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: PHI or HON.

PHI 1030 - Introduction to Ethics (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on the reading and writing preassessment placement tests
Description: This is a first philosophy course designed to introduce students to basic philosophical issues, primarily in the areas of moral and social philosophy. This course covers fundamental questions such as, for example: “What is the relation, if any, between morality and religion?” or “How should society be best organized?” Important cultural achievements, in the form of original and complete works, will be emphasized.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities Guaranteed Transfer: GT-AH3

PHI 1040 - Introduction to Eastern Religions (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on the reading and writing preassessment placement tests
Description: An introductory survey of the major religious communities of the East, with primary emphasis on the historical evolution and living traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities, Global Diversity

PHI 1050 - Introduction to Western Religions (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on the reading and writing preassessment placement tests
Description: An introductory survey of the major religious communities of the West (originating in the Near East), with primary emphasis on the historical evolution and living traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities

PHI 1110 - Language, Logic and Persuasion (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on the reading and writing preassessment placement tests
Description: This course is an introduction to critical analysis, thinking and expression, covering three main areas: (1) language: the significance of words, and their arrangements, in psychological appeals to the senses and the emotions; (2) logic: the structures of formal reasoning in arguments and in appeals to reason; and (3) persuasion: the rhetorical aspects of discourse and presentation, especially in appeals to ideals or character. Practical skills and applications will be emphasized.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities, Oral Communication

PHI 2040 - Philosophy of Religion (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): PHI 1040 or PHI 1050 recommended
Description: This is a course on the philosophical dimensions of religious faith and practice, the nature and scope of religious experience, and the existence and source of divinity.

PHI 2440 - Symbolic Logic (3 credits)
Description: This course is a general introduction to formal or symbolic logic. Topics covered include all aspects of sentential or propositional logic, beginning with the rules for determining the validity of deductive arguments and continuing through to the symbolization and syntax of the first-order predicate calculus.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities

PHI 3000 - History of Ancient Philosophy (3 credits)
Description: This course is a survey of the history of ancient philosophy, focusing on the Greeks. The life and work of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle receive special attention.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities

PHI 3020 - History of Modern Philosophy (3 credits)
Description: This course is a survey of the history of modern philosophy, from the Renaissance to Romanticism. The work of Descartes, Hume, and Kant receive special attention.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities

PHI 3120- Philosophy of Language (3 credits)

The philosophy of language can plausibly claim to be the most fundamental area of philosophy on the ground that the subject matter of philosophy is thought itself, and this can be studied only through language, its public vehicle. This course surveys major theories in this area.

PHI 3320- Metaphysics (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): If you receive an error because of prerequisites please contact the Philosophy Department at 303.615.0900.
Description: A comprehensive survey of metaphysics, dealing with problems of perennial and contemporary concern, such as the existence and nature of the soul, free will, God and substance.
PHI 3360 - Business Ethics (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): At least junior standing
Description: This course investigates the value conflicts that may arise from current circumstances in the modern business world. Designed to assist students in becoming effective business professionals, it examines four main areas of current practice in some detail: the responsibility of business in society, corporate governance, ethical decision-making, and ethical leadership. Interpretive, critical and analytical skills will be emphasized and cultivated.
General Studies: Arts and Humanities

PHI 3370 - Computers, Ethics, and Society (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): One of the following: Any PHI course or any CSI course or equivalent
Description: This course contains two main components: first, the ethical frameworks, relating to the nature of the person, in which three main concepts may emerge and be critically discussed: professionalism, privacy, and property; and second, the wider social, legal and political implications of computers, in particular for the nature of work, risk and legal liability, and the social context of computing (and other digital technologies).
General Studies: Arts and Humanities

PHI 3430 -Philosophy of Law (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): One upper-division course in the humanities or social sciences, or one philosophy course; or permission of instructor. 
Description: This course examines some of the conceptual foundations of law and some of the larger and smaller controversies in the philosophy of law. 

PHI 345D - VT: Philosophy of Race (3 credits)

Description: This course surveys some of the central philosophical issues regarding race and racism. Some of our guiding questions are; How have philosophers and scientists conceived of the concept of race/ Are races biological or social categories (or perhaps both)? Does race talk have meaning? Does it help us explain differences in performance and behavior? If so, how? What exactly is wrong with racism, racial prejudice, and discrimination? Are African Americans owed reparations for historical injustice? Although " race thinking" is a global phenomenon, this course focuses, particularly on the United States.

PHI 381X -VT: Major Philosophers  (3 credits)
Description: This course is meant to introduce advanced students to several central ideas in ethics and the philosophy of art developed by Kant and Novalis between 1781 and 1800, both for their own sake and as they bear upon the very idea of philosophy itself. We will pay especially close attention to their positions on practical reason and the alleged priority of the practical over the theoretical point of view, the role assigned to freedom in philosophical anthropology and moral philosophy, what the capacity for making and appreciating works of art reveals about human existence, and the nature, scope, and conditions of philosophical reflection and the systematic philosophical enterprise. On the last score, we will ask why certain theorists during the period of what has come to be known as Early Romanticism came to doubt the very possibility of systematic philosophy and what, if anything, might be said to stand in its place. 

PHI 4100 - Senior Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of all General Studies requirements and senior standing
Description: This course is a capstone course and is required of all philosophy majors. It is an in-depth consideration of a topic or author (or group of topics or authors) involving synoptic reflection, detailed interpretation, and thematic synthesis, with in-class presentations and an emphasis on philosophical writing. Please see the description for PHI 381X for more information. 
University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


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