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Federal, State and Local Government Funding Agencies 

If you know which government funding agencies may be the best fit for your project it can be more efficient to conduct your search directly on their web sites. These are the government funding agencies that we most frequently access. Click on the logos to be directed to their grant funding pages. 


 

Established by Congress in 1965, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is the independent federal agency whose funding and support gives Americans the opportunity to participate in the arts, exercise their imaginations, and develop their creative capacities. Through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector, the NEA supports arts learning, affirms and celebrates America’s rich and diverse cultural heritage, and extends its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community across America.


 

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency created in 1965. It is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States. NEH grants typically go to cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, colleges, universities, public television, and radio stations, and to individual scholars. The grants strengthen teaching and learning in schools and colleges; facilitate research and original scholarship; provide opportunities for lifelong learning; preserve and provide access to cultural and educational resources; and strengthen the institutional base of the humanities.


 

The National Institutes of Health (NIH, a Division of the US Department of Health and Human Services) is the largest public funder of biomedical research in the world, investing more than $32 billion a year to enhance life, and reduce illness and disability. NIH funded research has led to breakthroughs and new treatments, helping people live longer, healthier lives, and building the research foundation that drives discovery.

 


 

The National Science Foundation (NSF) funds research and education in most fields of science and engineering. It does this through grants, and cooperative agreements to more than 2,000 colleges, universities, K-12 school systems, businesses, informal science organizations and other research organizations throughout the United States. The Foundation accounts for about one-fourth of federal support to academic institutions for basic research. NSF receives approximately 40,000 proposals each year for research, education and training projects, of which approximately 11,000 are funded. In addition, the Foundation receives several thousand applications for graduate and postdoctoral fellowships. The agency operates no laboratories itself but does support National Research Centers, user facilities, certain oceanographic vessels and Antarctic research stations. The Foundation also supports cooperative research between universities and industry, US participation in international scientific and engineering efforts, and educational activities at every academic level.


 

 The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) is the extramural funding agency within US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education, and Economics mission area. NIFA invests in and advances agricultural research, education, and extension to help solve national challenges in agriculture, food, the environment, and communities. Working with scientists and researchers around the country, NIFA also makes vital contributions to science policy decision-making, often in collaboration with other federal agencies.


The Department of Commerce promotes job creation and economic growth by ensuring fair and reciprocal trade, providing the data necessary to support commerce and constitutional democracy, and fostering innovation by setting standards and conducting foundational research and development. The Department has one overarching goal: Helping the American Economy Grow. 


 

As the only federal government agency focused exclusively on economic development, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration (EDA) plays a critical role in facilitating regional economic development efforts in communities across the nation. Guided by the basic principle that sustainable economic development should be locally-driven, EDA works directly with communities and regions to help them build the capacity for economic development based on local business conditions and needs. EDA’s grant investments in planning, technical assistance, and infrastructure construction are designed to leverage existing regional assets to support the implementation of economic development strategies that make it easier for businesses to start and grow. Grants made under these programs are designed to leverage existing regional assets to support the implementation of economic development strategies that advance new ideas and creative approaches to advance economic prosperity in distressed communities.


 

Quoting Vannevar Bush, the US Department of Defense (DOD) states that "Basic research leads to new knowledge. It provides scientific capital. It creates the fund from which the practical applications of knowledge must be drawn. New products and new processes do not appear full-grown. They are founded on new principles and new conceptions, which in turn are painstakingly developed by research in the purest realms of science.” It is with these concepts in mind, that the Basic Research Office (BRO) approaches its role in oversight and management of DoD’s basic research investments. BRO sets scientific priorities aimed toward ensuring DoD is a leader in scientific discovery and identifying new paths for investigation. The office is responsible for setting Department policy for grants, and manages programs including: the Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship, the Minerva Research Initiative, Historically Black Colleges & Universities/Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) Program, as well as a number of pilot programs meant to rethink the Department’s approach to managing and maturing basic research investments.


 

The mission of the US Department of Education is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access. The Department of Education was created in 1980 by combining offices from several federal agencies. It is dedicated to: Establishing policies on federal financial aid for education, and distributing as well as monitoring those funds; Collecting data on America's schools and disseminating research; Focusing national attention on key educational issues; and, Prohibiting discrimination and ensuring equal access to education.


 

The mission of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) is to enhance and protect the health and well-being of all Americans. They fulfill that mission by providing for effective health and human services and fostering advances in medicine, public health, and social services. HHS contractors and grantees play a valuable role in helping to protect the health of all Americans and provide essential human services.


 

 The US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA, a division of the US Department of Health and Human Services) mission is to improve health outcomes and address health disparities through access to quality services, a skilled health workforce, and innovative, high-value programs. HRSA is the primary federal agency for improving health care to people who are geographically isolated, economically or medically vulnerable. HRSA programs help those in need of high quality primary health care, people living with HIV/AIDS, pregnant women, and mothers. HRSA also supports the training of health professionals, the distribution of providers to areas where they are needed most, and improvements in health care delivery.

 


The Colorado Department of Higher Education, working with the Colorado Commission on Higher Education, advocates, develops policies, and supports students to maximize higher education opportunities for all. They believe every Coloradan should have an education beyond high school to pursue their dreams and improve our communities. 

 


 

  The Colorado Department of Education (CDE) provides leadership, resources, support and accountability to the state’s 178 school districts, 1,888 schools, over 53,000 teachers and over 3,200 administrators to help them build capacity to meet the needs of the state’s approximately 905,000 public school students. As the administrative arm of the State Board of Education, CDE is responsible for implementing state and federal education laws, disbursing state and federal funds, holding schools and districts accountable for performance, licensing all educators, and providing public transparency of performance and financial data.


Colorado Department of Health and Human Services

 

 


 

The Denver Office of Economic Development & Opportunity is leading an inclusive and innovative economy for all Denver residents, businesses, and neighborhoods. By supporting local and global business development, affordable housing programs, and stabilization efforts in Denver’s diverse neighborhoods, they are creating opportunity for everyone to make a home, get a job, and build a future.  


The Denver Regional Council on Governments (DRCOG) is a Council of Governments, serving as a planning organization, technical assistance provider and forum for visionary local member governments. It functions as a Regional Planning Commission, per Colorado state statute, and prepares the plan for the physical development of the region, known as Metro Vision. DRCOG is also the federally designated Area Agency on Aging (AAA) and serves as the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the region.


 


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