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MSU Denver plus a STEM degree equals a rewarding career

MSU Denver is one of only 123 schools nationwide to be named a 2015 STEM Jobs Approved College — a national recognition for providing STEM education and helping graduates get jobs.

Metropolitan State University of Denver’s 15 science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs can prepare you for a high-paying career in Colorado’s‌STEM job market, which is expected to grow by 28 percent through 2018.

MSU Denver’s top-quality degree programs and some of the most affordable tuition rates among Colorado’s four-year institutions has resulted in a 26 percent increase in STEM enrollment, including a 95 percent increase in the number of students of color, since 2006. 

Success in the job market

Omar Hurricane, Ph.D. (B.S. physics ’90) is a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has received multiple national recognitions, including awards of excellence from the National Nuclear Security Administration and the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for National Security and Non-Proliferation from the Department of Energy. 

Albert Kennedy (B.S. meteorology and mathematics ’08) specializes in air pollution dispersion modeling, and works as the lead air-quality modeler for an environmental consulting firm.
• Miguel Hernandez, an engineering intern in the Pathways Internship Program, received the American Society of Civil Engineers “Outstanding Senior Civil Engineering Student” award in 2013.
• MSU Denver is one of only 123 schools nationwide to be named a 2015 STEM Jobs Approved College — a national recognition for providing STEM education and helping graduates get jobs

Advancement in the classroom

STEM students developed home-heating units that residents in a lower-income Denver neighborhood use to heat their homes at no cost. Led by Aaron Brown, assistant professor of mechanical engineering technology, the units are made mostly of recycled aluminum cans and powered by solar energy.
• The makers of System Tool Kit, an advanced aerospace and aviation modeling program, awarded a software package valued at nearly $3 million to MSU Denver based on the University’s competitive grant application. The software—available to students in the Advanced Aviation and Aerospace Flight Training Lab—is used by the military, federal agencies and major aerospace companies.

Omar Hurricane, Ph.D. (B.S.
physics ’90) is a physicist at
the Lawrence Livermore National
Laboratory and  has received
multiple national recognitions,
including awards of excellence
from the National Nuclear
Security Administration and the
Ernest  Orlando Lawrence Award
for National Security and
Non-Proliferation from the
Department of Energy.

• Biology Professor Rebecca Ferrell was honored in 2013 with the University’s “Exceptional Achievement in Undergraduate Research Leadership” for fostering undergraduate research opportunities. Farrell’s students have made 22 presentations to the American Society for Microbiology Rocky Mountain Branch and six presentations at the annual international meeting.
MSU Denver received a $620,000 grant in 2013 from the National Science Foundation to fund scholarships for students majoring in chemistry. 

Investment in the STEM pipeline

MSU Denver, as part of a consortium of nine Colorado community colleges, recently secured a $24.9 million grant to expand number of skilled manufacturing workers for Colorado industries.
• MSU Denver partners with the Colorado Center for the Blind to offer a workshop aimed at increasing access to STEM subjects for people with visual impairments. April Hill, assistant professor of chemistry, helped develop the workshop.
• MSU Denver partnered with Denver Public Schools to guide their investment of more than $7 million to expand STEM programs in nine schools in 2014, and with the Cherry Creek School District to offer high school students college credit for completing the district’s new capstone course in aviation fundamentals.
• Middle-school students in MSU Denver’s Summer Science Institute explore math and science by analyzing the microbiology in a water sample of Cherry Creek or studying the physics of roller coasters at Elitch Gardens.
• MSU Denver is embarking on an innovative project to integrate advanced manufacturing disciplines into a single new building to train a globally competitive workforce for the state of Colorado.


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