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GWS Course Descriptions

These are the course descriptions for courses that are offered by the Gender Institute for Teaching and Advocacy. Click the drop-down arrow for a course title to view more information.

Class Format: FtF = Face to Face; SPO = Self-paced online


Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the foundational concepts and theories underlying the interdisciplinary field of Gender, Women, and Sexualities Studies. This course utilizes a variety of educational materials including personal narratives, academic articles, media and cinema studies, and poetry and fiction. (3 Credits, Spring/Summer/Fall, FtF/Online/SPO)

  • Fulfills:
    • Social and Behavioral Science I (SBSI)

Course Description

This multidisciplinary course introduces the study of sexualities and genders including the history, major theories, racial intersections, and issues. Foundational concepts and vocabulary are taught so that the student will be equipped to take advanced courses in this area. General models of identity linked with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered sexualities are explored. Intersectional analysis will be applied with particular attention to the experiences of sexuality and gender in the Native American/Indigenous, African-American, Chicana/o, and Asian American communities. (3 Credits, Spring/Summer/Fall, FtF/Online/SPO)

  • Fulfills:
    • Social and Behavioral Science II (SBSII), Multicultural

Course Description

This course explores transgender and transsexual experience, focusing on Western cultural definitions and concepts. The course covers transgender basics, including definitions and language; the history of the transgender movement; the legal, social, and medical aspects of transition; current political issues within and for the movement; cultural aspects of gender diversity; well-known trans people in Western culture; working with transgender and transsexual populations; and being a good ally and advocate. By the end of the course, students will have the language, knowledge, and skills to work with transgender and transsexual populations in a variety of settings and will understand the diversity of the transgender experience. (3 Credits, Spring/Fall, FtF)

  • Fulfills:
    • Social and Behavioral Science II (SBSII)

Course Description

Though U.S. women share much in common, their differences are salient to a thorough understanding of all these womens experiences. Comparative analysis of womens race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation are central to this course. The similarities among diverse groups of women are also examined in order to better understand the complexity ofwomens lives. The course addresses issues of work, health, interpersonal violence, globalization, as well as resistance, activism, and social change across identities. (3 Credits, Spring/Summer/Fall, FtF/Online)

  • Fulfills:
    • Social and Behavioral Science II (SBSII), Multiculturual
  • Crosslisted:
    • WMS, AAS, or CHS

Course Description

This course focuses on feminist and queer research methods and methodologies specific to interdisciplinary research. It includes an overview of basic quantitative methods and analyses, along with an in-depth exploration of qualitative and mixed-methods research design. The course also covers topics such as: standpoint and critical theories, research ethics, feminist ethnography, and community research. The course provides a queer framework for critiquing power, authority, and knowledge, all of which are essential concepts in feminist and queer research design and analyses. (3 Credits, Spring, FtF)

  • Prerequisites:
    • GWS 1001 or GWS 1200

Course Description

This course provides an exploration of folklore in everyday life, including folk narrative and other verbal genres, as well as material forms and other manifestations of traditional expressive behavior, as it pertains to reinforcing and resisting gender identity and norms. This course focuses on the centrality and pervasiveness of creativity, developing a contextual approach to understanding aesthetic expression. (3 Credits, Spring/Fall, FtF)

  • Fulfills:
    • Arts & Humanities
  • Crosslisted:
    • ANT or WMS

No Description Available

 

(3 Credits, Spring/Summer/Fall, FtF)

Course Description

Students in this course examine multiple interdisciplinary discourses about gendered, sexed, raced, classed, and able bodies, beginning with Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex. Through discussion, lecture and critical evaluation of key theories in Body and Embodiment Studies (by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Susan Bordo, bell hooks, and Iris M. Young) students in this course explore the inscribed as well as the lived body-bodies that are gazed at, desired, fashioned, heard, and eroticized. In order to historically situate these discourses, the body is presented as a social construct that is controlled and manipulated but that also has unique experiences which cannot be verbalized and/or managed. (3 Credits, Spring, FtF)

  • Crosslisted:
    • ITP, SOC or WMS

Course Description

This course is designed to expose the student to the diverse and varied works of American Indian women. By looking inside the literature, music, and dance of the American Indian woman, students will explore the historical factors that have impacted the lives of both American Indians and non-native people, as well as the transition that American Indian women have made in order to survive and attempt to understand their struggles for freedom. (3 Credits, Summer, Online)

  • Prerequisites:
    • GWS 1001 or NAS 1000

Course Description

This course explores contemporary and historical beauty cultures (both in the U.S. and in a global context), their critiques, and their impact on the lived experience of individuals, including students enrolled in the course. Students discern and untangle the interplay between individual aesthetic impulses and larger cultural and structural forces as they pertain to the beautification of the human face and body. (3 Credits, Spring/Fall, FtF)

  • Prerequisites: 
    • ENG 1020

Course Description

This course surveys a broad array of scholarship in queer theory, as well as applications of queer theory in a variety of academic fields to explore practices, identities, and communities as well as the cultural construction of gender and sexuality. Note: Credit will be granted for one prefix only: SOC or WMS. (3 Credits, Fall, FtF)

  • Prerequisites:
    • GWS 1001 or GWS 1200

 

Course Description

Examination of women's legal rights under the U.S. legal system and Colorado law. Deals with family law, Equal Employment Opportunity Acts, housing, credit and finance, welfare, social security, abortion, prostitution, rape, and the ERA. Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CJC or WMS. (3 Credits, Summer/Fall, FtF)

  • Prerequisites:
    • CJC 1010 or WMS 1001 or Permission of Instructor

Course Description

This course explores the transnational production of gender and sexualities. It examines how people, ideas and capital moving accross borders play a role in the development of gender and sexual identities, practices, and communities. Through this focus, the course engages transnational phenomena such as tourism, migration, global LGBT communities, colonization and human rights. (3 Credits, Spring, FtF)

  • Prerequisites:
    • Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing and mathematics.

Course Descriptions

This course examines some of the key areas of inquiry in contemporary feminist theories and practices. Specifically, we reflect on feminist histories and question the notions of being, knowing, desiring and moving as sexed, gendered, raced, and classed beings. The course investigates the transformative contributions of liberal feminism, radical feminism, postcolonial and decolonial feminisms, queer theory and transnational feminisms to all academic disciplines. We identify how feminist theories and practices illuminate some of the pressing issues of our time, such as neocolonialism, environmental degradation, war, poverty and violence. (3 Credits, Fall, FtF)

  • Prerequisites:
    • GWS 1001, GWS 2100, and 6 additional hours of upper-division, GWS coursework; or permission of instructor.

Course Description

This course presents a cross-cultural study of women's lives in the developing world by examining two main issues: the influence of culture on women's issues and politics' impact on women. By the end of this course students will not only learn about the lives of women in the developing world but also become familiar with how women across the globe articulate the desire for equality. Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: WMS, ANT, or PSC. (3 Credits, Fall, FtF)

  • Prerequisites:
    • GWS 1001 or PSC 1020 or ANT 1310

Course Description

This course analyzes gender’s shaping global development and disaster vulnerability by focusing on the experiences of girls and women before, during, and after disastrous events. It examines intersecting patterns of vulnerability and response based on gender, class, race/ethnicity, age, nationality and other factors. Students examine gender-focused case studies from developed and developing societies and investigate the practical implications of gender-sensitive sociology of disaster. Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: WMS, SOC, or ANT. (3 Credits, Spring/Summer, Online)

Course Description

This course explores the spiritual, psychological, social, political, and cultural aspects ofthe women's spirituality movement through reading, research, critical reflection, writing, and optional creative /experiential projects. Students engage these concepts and theories in relation to women's experiences within diverse religious traditions, as well as personal spiritual understanding and practices. In addition, students apply a spiritual feminist critique to gender socialization, body image, cultural constructions of power and subordination, social activism, and personal agency. (3 Credits, Spring/Fall, Online)

  • Prerequisites:
    • WMS 1001 Recommended

Course Description

This course will give students the opportunity to focus on health issues specific to women and the challenges historically faced by women in the health care arena. This course explores feminist, biological, psychological, and sociological factors in women’s health within a global context. Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ITP, PSY, SOC, or WMS. (3 Credits, Fall, Online)

  • Prerequisites
    • WMS 1001 or SOC 1010 or ITP 1500 or PSY 1001

Course Description

This course introduces and synthesizes theories from philosophy, psychology, sociology, history, religion, and literature about love and sex. The complexities of love and sex, including their fundamental meanings, contemporary understandings, identity implications as well as their historical constructions are explored. An important dimension of this exploration is the source and meaning of the moral valuation assigned various forms of sexual activity. (3 Credits, Fall, FtF)

 

Course Description

Victim advocacy is both a professional career and area of study yet it is so often overlooked in traditional academic programs. Individuals who wish to become victim advocates often receive training on the job and not in an academic setting. This class hopes to provide a foundation to the field to complement trainings provided by local victim advocacy agencies and police departments. The primary focus of this class is victim advocacy for survivors of sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking (interpersonal violence). This course provides students with the intellectual and practical skills to understand the issue and provide effective advocacy for survivors of interpersonal violence in a multicultural context. The course explores interpersonal violence in society today, critical cultural considerations, the experience of survivors, and reflections on providing effective advocacy and activism. This is a challenging and rigorous course that asks students to critically think and write about the issues, systemic disparities, engage with difficult material and reflect on their own identities and privileges as it relates to the advocacy relationship. Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: WMS or HSP. (3 Credits, Fall, FtF)

  • Prerequisites:
    • WMS 1001 and six additional hours in Women's Studies or HSP 1010 amd six additional hours in Human Services

Course Description

Students analyze key patterns and trends in violence perpetrated by and against women, with special focus on the diverse experiences of women in the United States. Students will investigate historical, contemporary, sociopolitical, and cross-cultural patterns in causal factors, perpetuation, prevention, intervention and treatment relative to violence and women. Topics will include sexual violence, domestic violence, family violence, cyber-violence, women in prison, women on death row, and women as victims of violence, among others. Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: WMS or CJC or SOC or PSC. (3 Credits, Spring, Hybrid)

  • Prerequisites: WMS 1001 or SOC 1010 or CJC 1010 or PSC 1020 or Permission of Instructor

Course Description

Designed primarily for Gender, Women, and Sexualities Studies majors and minors, this seminar serves as the program capstone. The seminar focuses on interdisciplinary research writing and activism that students apply to a senior thesis and presentation. Thesis papers should reflect each students particular focus area within the program (e.g., Transnational and Cultural Diversity, Social Justice and Activism, Bodies and Sexualities, and Interdisciplinary) and represent the broader context of gender, women, and sexualities studies and feminist theory and praxis. (3 Credits, Spring)

  • Prerequisites:
    • GWS 2200, GWS 3510, completion of General Studies requirements, and senior standing; or permission of instructor.
  • Fulfills:
    • Senior Experience

Course Description

This course provides an internship experience in community-based, non-profit, government, or corporate agencies that serve gender and sexual minorities, and/or underserved populations. The internship allows the student to integrate and apply gender and social justice theories to their work with community organizations, under joint supervision of the placement supervisor and gender, women, and sexualities studies professor. (1-12 Credits, Spring/Summer/Fall, FtF/Online)

  • Prerequisites:
    • Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 and permission of instructor

Course Description

This course provides students with an intensive experience as an undergraduate teaching assistant in courses offered through Gender, Women, and Sexualities Studies (GWS) either on campus or online. Under close faculty supervision, this course provides training and support for students to learn about feminist pedagogy and processes involved in teaching gender, women, and sexualities studies courses. Students utilize what they have learned in previous GWS courses to assist other students enrolled in these classes. The experience includes workshop attendance with additional hours of application in the course. Students need to have already taken the course for which they will be serving as a Teacher Assistant. (1-6 Credits, Spring/Fall)

  • Prerequisites:
    • GWS 1001, GWS 1200, or GWS 2100 and GWS course for which the student will serve as TA with a grade of B or better

Course Description

Social justice encompasses research, activism and current events about manifestations of social oppression and social change. This course focuses upon psychological theory and self-identity in the context of multicultural and social justice issues (e.g., classism, racism, sexism, heterosexism, and ableism). Lectures, readings, and discussions are integrated with a required service learning placement involving 30 hours of volunteer work in a setting for the underserved. Students have the opportunity to a) reflect on their values, assumptions, place within, and emotional reactions to social oppressions; b) analyze the political systems that surround their communities and institutions; and c) apply their reflections to their career goals and personal development. (Course Availability TBA)

  • Prerequisites:
    •  GWS 1001 or PSY 1001 and six additional semester hours in Women’s Studies or six additional semester hours in Psychology
  • Fulfills:
    • Multicultural
  • Crosslisted:
    • HON, PSY, or GWS
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