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School of Education 2019-20 Annual Report header graphic.


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Executive Summary Header Graphic

This report provides a brief summary of the School of Education in 2019-2020. It is important to start this report with a recognition of the unprecedented and historic moment in the history of the country and world that began in Spring 2020. Indeed, as this report is being written, the world, including the School of Education faculty, staff, and administration, are still navigating the effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic, social unrest, and fiscal upheavals of 2020. The 2019-2020 academic year began with the usual excitement and energy of a new school year. We had been preparing for and looking forward to a reauthorization site visit by the state that was scheduled to happen in the spring semester, and we had a number of new initiatives and programs that would benefit students on which faculty and staff were focusing. Our funding, from both state and private coffers, was strong and our students were benefiting from multiple opportunities that awaited them. The future was extremely bright and the School of Education was poised to become an even stronger leader in teacher education. When the world suddenly shifted in March and many plans and most funding disappeared as a result of the Pandemic, the School of Education was no longer poised to become a leader: we launched as a leader. The foundation that we had been building over the six years since being established as a School of Education was tested, and it proved to be strong. The School of Education’s new Office of Clinical Experiences and Partnerships, Trauma Informed Practices initiative, focus on social justice and equity throughout all programs, and solid governance and fiscal processes had been severely tested and have withstood the challenges. As of this writing, the global Pandemic is still raging, but the School of Education is on solid ground. The expertise, passion, resilience, and focus of the faculty, staff, and students, have created an even stronger School of Education and ensured that, indeed, the SOE has a bright future ahead after all.

This annual report is organized around the three themes identified in the School of Education Strategic Plan: Excellence, Inclusivity/Diversity, and Collaboration.

The overall mission of the School of Education (SOE) remains to “prepare excellent teachers and educational leaders who engage in reflective practice and scholarly activity, and who are ethical decision makers and agents of social change.” We prepare teachers and educational leaders who will Teach the next generation of PreK-12 teachers who will take the Lead  in schools, communities, and with children, so that they can Transform  themselves into better people and their communities into better communities. Teach, Lead, Transform – it is what we do in the School of Education.

A great deal of time was spent in the fall of 2019 in preparing for our state reauthorization site visit with the CDE and CDHE that occurred in February 2020. The main news to report is that all the preparations, meetings with the state and throughout the university, the three-day on-site visit by the state, and the subsequent reports resulted in a successful reauthorization! The School of Education is officially authorized to continue preparing teachers by the state of Colorado.

Enrollment and retention in the School of Education continue to stabilize. Overall enrollment in 2019-2020 slightly decreased with the exception of our special education programs which, for the first time in years, increased. The increase in special education is especially important since the shortage of special education teachers across the nation is especially urgent. The SOE continues to have the highest retention rate in the whole university and increased to an impressive 82% last year. This percentage increased from 76% in 2018-19.

Faculty productivity also remained healthy in 2019-2020 with a total of 37 publications (with more under review) and presentations at 109 conferences and other venues. Faculty presentations increased significantly in 2019-2020, due to the culmination of various projects in which they have been working for years. In addition, 21 faculty members were involved in grant writing, which resulted in 10 new grants. The grants range from the internal grants of $2500 to the NSF 5-year grant of $1.5 million dollars.
Raising money for students and programs is a major goal of the School of Education. To that end, since 2014, when the School of Education was founded, donations and private funding to the SOE has increased by an incredible 442%. Grants and funded projects expenditures totaled over $2.1 million, allowing for faculty and leadership to advance the SOE and University mission even further. The increase in private funding demonstrates the community’s desire to invest in the SOE. In 2019-20, private giving for student scholarships and towards program enhancement totaled $248,187. The School of Education students still benefitted from a Daniels’ Fund $200,000 grant that was awarded in 2018, that advances quality Early Childhood Education in schools in the Denver area.

As an example of the widening impact of the School of Education, faculty members were invited to present in multiple venues concerning the Trauma Informed Practices (TIP) initiative. In addition, the dean testified before the state legislature and met with legislators and community members regarding a number of SOE and university programs while signaling support for various bills and position statements related to PreK-12 and higher education schooling.

The TIP program continues to grow and garner state and national recognition. Most importantly, TIP has trained hundreds of SOE students in understanding trauma in school children and how to address its effects to lessen its impact on learning. Because of the generous investments of donors and private foundations, SOE students and subsequently their PreK-12 students, have benefitted by this unique and impactful program.

Demonstrating our scale and commitment to providing students with real-life experiences in schools, students in their semesters prior to student teaching were placed in close to 1,000 classrooms and other educational settings in approximately 16 school districts, including Denver Public Schools, Jefferson County Public Schools, and Aurora Public Schools. In addition to the field placements, the SOE arranged for over 330 student teaching placements. In short, we are big and our students are in schools across the Front Range.

The accomplishments and activities of the three SOE Departments and Alternative Licensure Programs are described below. Dean Hinde assumed the role of state Co-Chair of the Colorado Council of Deans of Education (CCODE) and continues to be active in national organizations. She also serves on a number of local boards and committees. In addition, Dean Hinde was tapped to lead a number of university initiatives, including a presidential task force charged with examining and revamping the university transfer process.

Excellence Graphic Header


The School of Education faculty, staff, and students are committed to excellence in teaching and educator preparation through data-driven decision making.

In 2019–20, School of Education program headcount decreased overall compared to the same time last year. The secondary education program, where students actually major in one of the Arts and Sciences in the College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences (i.e., students major in history so they can become history teachers and take classes in the SOE for teacher licensure, major in English so they can become English teachers, etc.) had the biggest decline in students. However, there was an increase in students in Special Education and Alternative Licensure programs.

 

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Retention of education students is a high priority in the School of Education. As a result of efforts of advisors and faculty, the SOE continues to have the highest retention rates in the university at 82%.

 

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Last year, 315 traditional and Alternative Licensure Program (ALP) School of Education students completed program requirements including student teaching. Of those reporting their new teaching jobs to us, the top four districts in which they were hired were Denver Public Schools, Jefferson County Schools, Douglas County Schools, and Cherry Creek Schools.

 

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Understanding the need for more educators in targeted fields, particularly math and science, in 2019-2020 faculty from the SOE and the College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences (LAS) continued their collaboration in implementing a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant of approximately $1.2 million that will increase the number of students from traditionally underrepresented groups who are preparing to teach in STEM fields.

School of Education faculty were busy in 2019-2020 with professional development, grants, and other scholarly activities. The dean also was involved in grant writing and conducting professional presentations as well. The dean and associate dean are co-Principal Investigators in an ongoing $8.2 million grant that is in its fourth year of a five year federal grant that is funding the Western Education Equity Access Center.

 

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Departmental Updates:

TED 1 – Elementary Education & Literacy

  • MSU Denver student performance on the 5001 Praxis continued a steady trend upwards over the last three years in all four subtests.
  • Five faculty had peer-reviewed proposals accepted for the American Education Research Association conference.
  • Dr. Sue Ahrendt presented at the Northern Rocky Mountain Educational Research Association on school and university collaboration.
  • Literacy faculty in the Department of Elementary Education met for a summer retreat with monthly fall follow-up meetings to evaluate and revise literacy courses.
  • Dr. Sue Ahrendt co-authored a peer-reviewed article in Mathematics Teacher on “Using Models to Build Fraction Understanding.”
  • Dr. Sandra Leu Bonnano co-authored a chapter focused on dual language principals in Educational Leadership of Immigrants: Case Studies in Times of Change.
  • Participatory Research with Young Children (2019) included a chapter by Dr. Krista Griffin on practices for interviewing young children.
  • Dr. Ingrid Carter continued her national collaborations with co-authored publications on preservice teachers in Innovations in Science Teacher Education.
  • Dr. Sue Ahrendt piloted content-focus, math praxis tutoring workshops for teacher candidates preparing for the Praxis 5001 math subtest.

 

TED 2 – Special Education, Early Childhood and Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Education

Faculty in TED 2 regularly attend and present at conferences, study best practices, and conduct research in their areas of expertise. The following examples of scholarship activities demonstrate and continue to grow excellence in TED2.
Publications
  • Meek, S., Smith, L., Allen, R., Catherine, E. (2020). Start with Equity: From the Early Years to the Early Grades. Children’s Equity Project
  • Steed, E., & Shapland, D. (2019). Adapting social emotional multi-tiered systems of supports for kindergarten classrooms. Early Childhood Education Journal, 48(2), 135-146.
  • Sanjurjo, C., Chávez, L., & Evenstad, J.P. (2019). Becoming more effective culturally responsive educators. Revista de Educación de Puerto Rico (REduca), 2(2), 1-30.
  • Whitmore, K.F., Angleton, C., Pruitt, J., & Miller-Crume, S. (2019). Putting a focus on social emotional and embodied learning with the Visual Learning Analysis (VLA). Early Childhood Education Journal, 47(5), 549-558.
  • Whitmore, K. F., & Meyer, R. J. (2020). Reclaiming Literacies as Meaning Making: Manifestations of Values, Identities, Relationships, and Knowledge. New York, NY: Routledge.

Conference Presentations

  • Buckley, P. C. M., & Murza, K., (2020). Supporting communication – It’s everyone’s job!, Council for Exceptional Children Convention & Expo 2020, Portland, OR.
  • Herring, T. J. & Urbanek, T. (2020). Assisting students who have been bullied, support for teachers, Council of Exceptional Children, Portland, OR.
  • Whitmore, K. F., Chisholm, J. S., & Fletcher, L. (2019). Mediating transformative learning from challenging texts like Towers Falling with the arts. Literacy Research Association, Tampa, FL.

Workshops Attended

  • Multiple faculty participated in the Faculty Learning Communities offered throughout the year, "Trauma Informed Pedagogy Workshop," Resilient Futures, Denver, CO.
  • Dr. Dorothy Shapland completed the Continuing Education Program, ECED 5311: Early Childhood Equity and Leadership, at the University of Colorado, Denver, Denver, CO.
  • Dr. Elmer Harris attended the EdFest 2019, Fellowship of Black Male Educators, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Dr. Peter Vigil attended the WIDA Annual Conference, Providence, RI.

 

TED 3 – Secondary, K-12 & Educational Technology

  • TED 3 faculty actively participated in professional learning activities such as seminars/workshops/ conferences to gain skills and knowledge in their fields. In 2019-2020 academic year, faculty attended more than 60 learning events. 
  • TED 3 faculty were actively involved in presenting research and publishing journal articles/books. In the 2019-2020 academic year, faculty did more than 24 refereed and 3 non-refereed/invited presentations, published 2 refereed journal articles, 4 books/book chapters, and more than 3 other non-refereed forms of publications. One article and one book are still under review.
  • TED 3 had at least one external grant and 4 internal grants written and submitted. Three internal grants were accepted.
  • Dr. Jose Martinez was awarded an internal grant on Open Education Resources and has been piloting the use of OERs in his classes. The switch to remote teaching/learning environment in the spring actually turned out to be a great opportunity for piloting the OERs.
  • Dr. Philip Bernhardt created the undergraduate research class EDS 4010, which provides non-licensure seeking students, IDP students, and anybody interested in learning about research the opportunity to complete senior experience through this course.
  • Dr. Philip Bernhardt was elected as Councilor in the Education Division for Council of Undergraduate Research.
  • Faculty updated curricula with the new Colorado Teacher Quality Standards and integrated the new ELL standards into curricula.
  • Educational Technology team launched the completely online instructional technology certificate program.
  • Dr. Kathryn Young is working with colleagues on Trauma Informed Practices curriculum integration and research.
  • Dr. Jan Perry-Evenstad is the chair of international education committee, which is built to review and discuss study abroad course proposals.
  • Dr. Janelle Johnson continued to lead a team/project funded by the National Science Foundation ($ 1,449,970) on inclusive STEM teaching preparation at an urban commuter university (U-STEM). This is a 5-year project starting in Fall 2017.
  • K-12 Physical Education team continued to work on the curriculum improvement to make it cutting edge for our students, including meeting the trends in the field, integrating state ELL standards, updating Teacher Quality Standards, bringing courses offered by other program into its own program (e.g. converting HPS 2030 to PETE 2030), and planning on moving courses to hybrid or online format to bring flexibility and convenience to students to increase retention and enrollment.
  • Job placement for K-12 Physical Education graduates was strong with 87% of 2019-2020 graduates securing full time teaching physical education jobs. Many graduates continue to be leaders in their districts.

 

Inclusivity/Diversity Header Graphic


The School of Education is committed to being representative and reflective of the population that it serves.

The race/ethnicity breakdown for all teacher education students enrolled in 2019-20 showed 24% were of Hispanic origin, and all students of color accounted for 35% of the total.

 

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In 2019-20, close to 1,000 placements in schools were coordinated for education student field experiences (prior to student teaching) and student teaching activities. These placement experiences are intended to introduce students to classrooms and facilities in the Denver metropolitan area, and the populations they serve. Most of the Preschool through 12th grade students at the placement schools were eligible for Free or Reduced Lunch. Over a third of the clinical placement schools had more than 60% of students who were eligible for Free and Reduced Lunch. For all placements, the average percentage of students eligible for Free and Reduced Lunch is 47% – adding very diverse perspectives and experiences to our students’ education careers.

  • Close to 50% of our clinical placements were in schools with a diverse student body - more than half of the students were students of color 
  • Over a third of our clinical placements were at schools that are eligible for Title I funds

In 2019-20, three faculty members were promoted to Full Professor. In addition, we wished a fond farewell to three valued faculty members who retired: Dr. Peggy Anderson, Professor of Special Education; Dr. Malinda Jones, Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education; and Kathy Nelson, Lecturer in Literacy.


Departmental Updates
:

TED 1 – Elementary Education & Literacy

  • As new tenure track faculty, Dr. Sandra Leu Bonnano enhanced departmental expertise through her focus on culturally sustaining practices and school leadership.
  • Dr. Jessica Voorhis joined our elementary residency site coordinators, bringing her expertise in culturally and linguistically diverse education and school leadership.
  • Faculty teaching the department’s multicultural course collaborated in piloting a new key task focused on equity.
  • Dr. Krista Griffin continued international collaboration with the Switzerland Exchange Coordinator for Zurich University of Teacher Education (ZUTE).
  • Dr. Ofelia Schepers co-chaired the SOE committee on Diversifying the Teacher Workforce (DTW) and began serving as a DTW representative on the SOE cabinet.
  • Dr. Sandra Leu Bonnano’s work on culturally sustaining school leadership was the topic of a peer-reviewed AERA presentation.

 

TED 2 – Special Education, Early Childhood and Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Education

Faculty in TED 2 work to put into practice our shared values of inclusivity and diversity. Related activities are:
  • Faculty presented on issues of equity and diversity at numerous conferences; for example:
    • Shapland, D., & Harris, E. (2020). Leading for equity & resilience: Teachers and trauma, 2020 Leadership Connections National Conference, McCormick Center for Early Childhood Leadership, Chicago, IL.
    • Dr. Rosemarie Allen was a keynote speaker at the Nebraska Early Childhood Collaborative, the Vermont Association for the Education for Young Children Conference, and the Maryland Family Engagement Summit, among many others.
  • Dr. Charlie Buckley, with J. Buckley, was selected for an MSU Denver TEDx presentation called, "Inclusion."
  • Dr. Lorretta Chavez and Dr. Peter Vigil presented “English Language Learner (ELL) Standards & Impact on Educator Preparation Programs” for faculty of the MSU Denver School of Education and College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.
  • Dr. Lorretta Chavez, Dr. Elmer Harris, Dr. Rosemarie Allen, and Dr. Dorothy Shapland served on the School of Education Diversifying Teacher Workforce Committee.
  • Dr. Kathy Whitmore published the following feature article:

    Henderson, J., Warren, K., Whitmore, K.F., Seely Flint, A., Laman, T.T., & Jaggers, W. (2020). Take a close look: Inventorying your classroom library for diverse books. The Reading Teacher, 73(6), 747-755.
  • Dr. Rebecca Canges submitted a grant called "Voices from the Classroom: General Education Teacher’s Perspectives on their Preparation for Supporting Students with Disabilities Included in their Classroom," Metropolitan State University of Denver, $1,700.00.

 

TED 3 – Secondary, K-12 & Educational Technology

  • Dr. Kathryn Young continued to work on research and projects on multicultural topics. She serves as a qualified facilitator of Intercultural Development inventory program, one of the premier cross-cultural assessments of intercultural competence to build intercultural competence to achieve international and domestic diversity and inclusion goals and outcomes.
  • Dr. Philip Bernhardt was involved in Honors program as associate director on behalf of School of Education, trying to bridge School of Education faculty/students and the Honors program.
  • Dr. Janelle Johnson’s U-STEM team continued to recruit student scholars to increase the number and diversity of math and science teachers serving high need schools.
  • Dr. Jan Perry Evenstad served the CO-National Association for Multicultural Educators as a board member and co-chair, promoting multicultural education.
  • Dr. Jan Perry Evenstad, director of the Western Educational Equity Assistance Center continued to work on the project funded by the Department of Education ($8,453,437) to provide technical assistance and training upon request, at no cost, covering the civil rights areas of Title IV, Title VI and Title IX. She did many presentations and workshops on these topics. She also had one podcast on anti-racism for white educators.
  • Dr. Philip Bernhardt continued to work with colleagues towards meeting the goals of Diversifying Teacher WorkForce Committee. This committee discusses issues and finds ways to recruit and support teacher candidates of color. One of the goals is to find scholarship to help recruit teacher candidates of color (Roadrunners Multicultural Scholars Program). 
  • K-12 Physical Education program emphasizes inclusion. There is one course specifically about inclusion. Drs. Sue Barnd and Nhu Nguyen presented on inclusion and discussed diversity, inclusion, racism and TIP in classes. Dr. Nhu Nguyen has ongoing research on diversity in PE.
  • The K-12 Physical Education program successfully completed its third year in TED 3 after moving over from the College of Professional Studies. This successful transition demonstrated inclusivity and increased the diversity of our faculty, students, and the department. 
  • TED 3’s new assistant professor added more diversity to the department. TED 3 now has 4 male full-time faculty (2 White, 1 Asian, and 1 Hispanic) and 7 female full-time faculty (5 White and 2 Asian).

 

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The School of Education is committed to fostering collaboration among internal and external stakeholders dedicated to excellence in teaching and educator preparation.

The dean continues to work with the external community at the state and national levels in advancing university-based teacher education for the overall improvement of PreK-12 schools. In 2019-20 she began the first year of a two years term as Co-Chair of the statewide Colorado Council of Deans of Education (CCODE). She also continues to participate in convenings of the Education Deans for Justice and Equity (EDJE), a national organization of deans of education from all types of IHEs focused on advancing policies and practices that ensure equity in schools and university teacher education programs. She also served past-president of the Teacher Education Council of State Colleges and Universities (TECSCU), another national level university teacher education organization. In addition, she continued her work with legislators and university government affairs personnel on legislative matters involving PreK-higher education and was able to testify in support of a bill prior to the state shut down that resulted from the Pandemic.

In 2019-20, faculty worked with local school districts and facilities to provide the opportunity for education students to receive hands on experiences related to their programs prior to, and including, student teaching. Close to 1,000 placements for field experiences prior to student teaching were coordinated over the last year, with higher percentages of students going to Denver Public Schools, Jefferson County Schools, and Aurora Public Schools, followed by Douglas County, Adams 12, and Westminster Public Schools.

 

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In addition, over 330 student teaching placements were coordinated in surrounding districts, with higher percentages of students going to Denver Public Schools, Jefferson County Schools, Cherry Creek Schools, Brighton School District, and Aurora Public Schools.

 

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Each semester, School of Education affiliate and full-time faculty are spending as much as 450 hours in schools and other facilities that provide educational services to children throughout Colorado, particularly around metropolitan Denver. Faculty service activities, including and in addition to, their time in local schools and facilities during 2019-20 were extensive.

 

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Students in education programs will have spent between 800 and 1260 hours in these same schools and facilities during their academic careers at MSU Denver. In 2019-20 the SOE continued collaborations with Denver Public Schools, Jefferson County Schools, District 27J, and Aurora Public Schools in the yearlong elementary residency model for during the school year.

In 2019-20 School of Education faculty collaborated with peers in their fields to conduct presentations at national and international education venues (see Professional Development chart in Excellence section). In addition to collaborating with colleagues in schools and nationally, faculty from the School of Education frequently collaborated with colleagues across the university on publications, grants, and other initiatives, as mentioned in Departmental Updates.

 

Departmental Updates:

TED 1 – Elementary Education & Literacy

  • Dr. Krista Griffin, Dean Liz Hinde, and Dr. Corey Sell presented research on the undergraduate elementary residency through three national peer-reviewed venues.
  • Dr. Sandra Leu Bonnano, Dr. Krista Griffin, and Dr. Corey Sell were awarded minigrants to integrate Trauma Informed Practices into five courses.
  • Elementary science and math faculty presented their inquiry-based focus for department wide conversations on infusing this focus into coursework. 
  • Dr. Deborah Horan and Dr. Brooke Evans (Mathematics Department) contributed to statewide revision of the Elementary Education Degree with Designation.
  • Dr. Sue Ahrendt and Dr. Corey Sell co-lead contingency planning task forces, one on teaching and one on fields, during the Spring 2020 COVID transition.
  • Elementary Residency Site Coordinators, Ms. Ali O’Brien, Dr. Kathleen Luttenegger, Ms. Julie Eber, and Dr. Jessica Voorhis, continued their district (27J, Jeffco, DPS, APS) collaboration in placing and supervising close to 70 residents.
  • Dr. Roland Schendel served as Caucus chair for the MSU Denver faculty senate.
  • Dr. Krista Griffin served as co-chair of an Early Career Network Luncheon at the Annual Conference of the Colorado Council of the International Literacy Association.
  • Faculty in the Elementary Education and Literacy and History continued offering Praxis 5001 Multiple Subjects workshops for teacher candidates in three majors.

 

TED2 – Special Education, Early Childhood and Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Education

  • Dr. Vicki Nilles was the faculty advisor for the Metro Early Childhood Education Association and an Executive committee member of the Colorado Association of Teacher Educators.
  • Dr. Rosemarie Allen served as a member on the Classroom to Career Hub Development Group and the Provost and Vice President Search Committee.
  • Dr. Rebecca Canges served as a member of the Teaching Excellence Committee and the Undergraduate Research Program Advisory Council.
  • Dr. Lorretta Chavez served as a member of the Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) Committee.
  • Dr. Kara Halley served on the Faculty Senate Retention, Tenure, and Promotion Committee.
  • Dr. Peter Vigil served as President of the Charter School Board of Trustees, a member of the Tenure-Track Supper Club, and a member of the Higher Education & Linguistically Diverse Education (HELDE).
  • Dr. Malinda Jones was a board of advisors member for the Community College of Denver ECE Advisory Board and a member of the Denver Early Childhood Council Board.
  • Dr. Tina Herring served as a board member for the Universal Education Foundation (UEF).

 

TED3 – Secondary, K-12 & Educational Technology

  • Educational Technology faculty continued to collaborate with instructional designers and online office to develop courses for the instructional technology certificate program and discuss on the improvement and future of the program.
  • TED 3 worked closely with College of Letters, Arts and Sciences teacher educators on the preparation for Colorado Department of Education program reauthorization (completed in February, 2020) and we continued to collaborate on program improvement and to help students complete their programs smoothly.
  • Dr. Janelle Johnson worked with colleagues in Math and Earth and Aerospace Science on STEM education and grant work/writing. 
  • Drs. Nhu Nguyen and Sue Barnd collaborated with K-12 physical educators on the Advisory Board to improve our K-12 Physical Education program and help our students connect with the field.
  • Dr. Kathryn Young collaborated with other SOE colleagues on designing and developing trauma informed curricula.
    TED 3 faculty collaborated with scholars/faculty outside MSU Denver on research projects/presentations/manuscripts/publications.
  • Dr. Sue Barnd was a member of the University-wide Strategic Planning committee that pivoted to become the Futures team and collaborated with multiple stakeholders across the university. 
  • Dr. Philip Bernhardt was elected as Councilor in the Education Division for Council of Undergraduate Research. He is also an officer for Colorado ACT Council. The roles required him to collaborate with many scholars/researchers/stakeholders in the field.
  • Dr. Kathry Young and the department chair worked with the Innovative and Lifelong Learning Office on finalizing one concurrent enrollment course (EDS 1001 - Educational (In)Equality in the 21st Century) to be offered in high schools.
  • TED 3 faculty who taught field experience classes in the spring collaborated with affiliate faculty on designing/developing projects for online field work in response to remote teaching/learning.
  • TED 3 faculty collaborated with scholars/faculty outside MSU Denver on research projects/presentations/manuscripts/publications.

 

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The 2019-20 year brought increased funding to the School of Education.  Grant and sponsored project expenditures totaled close to $2.2 million. Private giving through the University Advancement office totaled over $247,187.00.  Since 2014, dollar amount donations to the SOE have increased 442%.  The number of unique donors (that is, donors who are new to donating to the SOE) have increased from 16 in 2014 to 60 in 2020.  While most of the donations are for scholarships, some have funded the general SOE fund and specific programs.  Here is a snapshot of how private giving to the SOE has increased over the past several years:

 

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In addition, over $75,000 was awarded this last year in scholarships to support 39 teacher education students.  The decrease in funding is mainly due to the exhaustion of two grants that supported students and a decrease in private foundation support in the last months of the year that resulted from the Pandemic.

 

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