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Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Events


Date: Wednesday, September 9, 2020

Time: 2:30 - 4:00 pm

Location: Virtual

Event Sponsor: Department of Music, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Details:

The MSU Denver Department of Music, with support from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, is excited to announce our 2020/2021 Virtual Visiting Artist Series on Music, Race, & Social Justice. This year-long series highlights the work of BIPOC musicians, performers, and scholars. 
Beginning on Wednesday, September 9, we are excited to host New York-based Puerto Rican singer, filmmaker and activist Taína Asili for a performance and talkback moderated by Dr. Michael Benitez, VP for Diversity and Inclusion at MSU Denver. 
Taína Asili is a New York based Puerto Rican singer, filmmaker and activist carrying on the tradition of her ancestors, fusing past and present struggles into one soulful and defiant voice. Her music combines powerful vocals carrying themes of social justice with an energetic fusion of Afro-Latin, reggae and rock. For over 20 years she has brought the music of love and resistance to venues across the globe – From the Women’s March on Washington to Carnegie Hall to the main stage of San Francisco. After the 2016 election, a bigger audience has caught up to the artist Huffington Post named one of “12 Freedom Fighting Bands to Get you Through the Trump Years.” Her protest songs “No Es Mi Presidente” and “Freedom,” inspired by social movements against white supremacy, mass incarceration, and police violence, have been lauded by the likes of Rolling Stone and Billboard. Taína Asili’s music exudes strength of spirit, and inspires audiences to dance to the rhythm of rebellion.

Date: Thursday, October 1, 2020

Time: 5:00 - 6:30 pm

Location: Virtual

Event Sponsor: Department of Music, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Details:

The MSU Denver Department of Music, with support from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, is excited to announce our 2020/2021 Virtual Visiting Artist Series on Music, Race, & Social Justice. This year-long series highlights the work of BIPOC musicians, performers, and scholars.

On Thursday, October 1 the series is proud to feature members of The Dream Unfinished (http://thedreamunfinished.org/) for a chamber music performance, program discussion, and Q&A moderated by Dr. Brandon Matthews, Associate Professor of Music and Director of Orchestras at MSU Denver.

The Dream Unfinished is an activist orchestra. Its mission is to use classical music as a platform to engage audiences in dialogues surrounding social and racial justice. The Dream Unfinished is an orchestra that looks and sounds like New York City. TDU’s 2020 season The Red, White, and Blues will use classical music to spark dialogues on voting rights and voter suppression and promote greater civic engagement throughout NYC.

Richard T. Castro Distinguished Visiting Professorship 2019 || October 23 2019, St. Cajetan's Event Center Auraria Campus


Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Time: 5:00 - 7:50 pm

Location: Virtual

Event Sponsor: Chicana/o Studies Department, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Details:

Please join us for a professional development session for students, student teachers, educators, and community featuring Dr. Angela Valenzuela and Dr. Chris Milk of Academia Cuauhtli. Rooted in the development of Academia Cuauhtli, a Saturday school in Austin, Texas that offers Mexican American Studies and Tejano history and culture in Spanish to 4th graders from Sanchez, Metz, Houston, Perez, and Zavala Elementary Schools, this session will challenge hegemonic practices, knowledge production and literacy in schools. By centering the experiences of Latinx students in spaces where they historically been ignored and silenced, Dr. Valenzuela and Dr. Milk will inform how we can shift our classroom practices to elevate Latinx youth, family, and community knowledges to academically support and enrich student learning.    

 

Richard T. Castro Distinguished Visiting Professorship 2019 || October 23 2019, St. Cajetan's Event Center Auraria Campus 

Date: Thursday, October 8, 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:30 pm

Location: Virtual

Event Sponsor: Chicana/o Studies Department, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Details:

Angela Valenzuela, Ph.D.In 1969, Chicana/o students marched out of West High School in Denver, Colorado, demanding changes to the public school system, including an increase in educational opportunity, the inclusion of Chicana/o culture, history, and perspectives in the school curricula, an increase in Chicana/o teachers, and relief from the racism that they experienced in school. 

Forty-one years later and in the midst of a global pandemic, Chicana/o/x and Latina/o/x communities continue to negotiate inequitable conditions in schools compounded by the current social and political climate that has brought educational inequities into sharper focus. Yet, in the face of this adversity, just as Chicana/o communities did forty-one years ago, Chicana/o/x and Latina/o/x communities today are resilient and strategic in the ways that they negotiate these new barriers and actively work to dismantle long-standing systemic inequities.  

Richard T. Castro Distinguished Visiting Professorship welcomes, Dr. Angela Valenzuela. Dr. Valenzuela has a long history of research and teaching in the sociology of education, minoritized youth in schools, educational policy, urban education reform, culturally relevant curriculum, Ethnic Studies, and indigenous education. Her foundational book, Subtractive Schooling: U.S.-Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring, carefully documents how schools “…rather than functioning as a conduit for the attainment of the American Dream, subtract resources from Mexican youth.”  This work along with numerous other publications, including her most recent publication, Growing Critically Conscious Teachers: A Social Justice Curriculum for Educators of Latino/a Youth, has culminated in the co-founding and directing of Academia Cuauhtli, a partnership-based, community-anchored Saturday school that centers Mexican American and Indigenous knowledge and has had district-wide positive impacts in Austin, Texas. 

Valenzuela differentiates between education and the form it often takes, schooling. Schooling processes that lack the critical aspects can divest Chicana/o/x and Latina/o/x students of their cultural wealth and lead to alienation, disengagement, and lack of academic success.  Chicana/o/x and Latina/o/x communities deeply value education and all the possibilities of its promise.  Thus, the theme of this year’s professorship asks us to reflect on the ways that Chicana/o/x and Latina/o/x communities have reclaimed and continue to reclaim schooling to radically reimagine the work of education. 

 

Richard T. Castro Distinguished Visiting Professorship 2019 || October 23 2019, St. Cajetan's Event Center Auraria Campus 

Date: Thursday, October 8, 2020

Time: 5:00 - 7:00 pm

Location: Virtual

Event Sponsor: Chicana/o Studies Department, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Details:

Ethnic Studies emerged out of th1960s civil rights movement and demands from students of color for better access to higher education, the inclusion of their history, culture, and perspectives in the school curricula, an increase in professors of color, and the implementation of ethnic studies programs that centered the interdisciplinary study of race, ethnicity, and indigeneity (Hu-DeHart, 1993). Since then, ethnic studies programs have proliferated across the country and into K-12 curricula with many states now requiring ethnic studies to graduate from high school.  Research has documented the powerful impact of ethnic studies on school engagement and connection, retention, and ultimately graduation.  Moreover, ethnic studies foster critical thinking and on students’ understanding of and attitudes about race and/or people who differ from themselves” (Sleeter, 2011). Please join us for a community panel discussion on the transformational work of ethnic studies.

 

 Richard T. Castro Distinguished Visiting Professorship 2019 || October 23 2019, St. Cajetan's Event Center Auraria Campus

Date: Thursday, October 15, 2020

Time: 5:00 - 6:30 pm

Location: Virtual

Event Sponsor: Department of Music, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Details:

The MSU Denver Department of Music, with support from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, is excited to announce our 2020/2021 Virtual Visiting Artist Series on Music, Race, & Social Justice. This year-long series highlights the work of BIPOC musicians, performers, and scholars.

On Thursday, October 15, closing out Latinx Heritage Month, we are excited to virtually host members of ¡Aparato! for a performance and talk followed by a Q&A moderated by IPutu Tangkas Adi Hiranmayena, Affiliate Faculty in Music at MSU Denver.

Easily—if not quite accurately—described as “jarocho punk”, the aural landscape transmitted by ¡Aparato! bridges the terrestrial with the ethereal: earthbound concerns meet the means to transcend, through sound and imagery; a here, now and a somewhere else, something better, both at once. This is a science fiction soundtrack for tomorrow’s Raza, “the people,” time travelers, and visionaries.

¡Aparato! embodies the narratives and struggles of the world’s migratory people: Cat (Nancy Méndez) is of Mixtec and Zapotec heritage from indigenous Oaxaca to Anaheim, California. El Tejarocho (Alexandro D. Hernández) was raised between Los Angeles, the Texas-Mexican border and rural Michoacán, México.

¡Aparato! has achieved critical acclaim on NPR's All Things Considered, NPR's Top 100 Songs of 2016, OC Weekly, Austin Chronicle, and Smithsonian Folkways. ¡Aparato! has performed for audiences at the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Latin Alternative Music Conference, Grand Performances (Los Angeles), including national and international tours. Their music continues to draw upon their vision of punk-futurism grounded in the instrumentation of their Mexican and Central American ancestors.

Date: Thursday, October 28, 2020

Time: 2:30 - 4:00 pm

Location: Virtual

Event Sponsor: Department of Music, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Details:

The MSU Denver Department of Music, with support from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, is excited to announce our 2020/2021 Virtual Visiting Artist Series on Music, Race, & Social Justice. This year-long series highlights the work of BIPOC musicians, performers, and scholars.

On Thursday, October 28 we are thrilled to welcome New Orleans musician, book author, and ethnographic photographer Bruce Sunpie Barnes to our virtual series, for a talk and discussion moderated by Dr. Elizabeth Macy, Professor of Ethnomusicology at MSU Denver.

Sunpie is a 17-year member of the Black Men of Labor Social Aid and Pleasure Club, Big Chief of the Northside Skull and Bones Gang (One of the oldest existing Afro-Creole carnival groups in New Orleans), and the bandleader of the popular New Orleans musical group Sunpie and the Louisiana Sunspots. His latest book and CD project is entitled Le Kèr Creole ( The Creole Heart) which he co-authored with Rachel Breunlin and Leroy Etienne. 

A former National Park Service Ranger, photographer, former high school biology teacher (30 years), former college football All-American, and former NFL football player (Kansas City Chiefs), Sunpie Barnes' many careers have taken him far and wide. He has traveled to over 53 countries playing his own style of what he calls Afro-Louisiana music, incorporating blues, zydeco, creole jazz, gospel, work songs, Caribbean and African influenced rhythms and melodies. He is a multi-instrumentalist, mastering accordion, harmonica, and piano along with rubboard, talking drum, and djembe.

Date: Thursday, November 12, 2020

Time: 2:30 - 4:00 pm

Location: Virtual

Event Sponsor: Department of Music, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Details:

The MSU Denver Department of Music, with support from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, is excited to announce our 2020/2021 Virtual Visiting Artist Series on Music, Race, & Social Justice. This year-long series highlights the work of BIPOC musicians, performers, and scholars. 

Wrapping up our Fall 2020 series is Singer, Speaker, Educator, and 'RAPtivist' (rap activist) Aisha Fukushima (https://aishafukushima.com/) with an exciting keynote moderated by Dr. Michael Benitez, VP for Diversity and Inclusion at MSU Denver.

Fukushima founded RAPtivism (Rap Activism), a hip hop project spanning 20 countries and four continents, amplifying universal efforts for freedom and justice. She is a multilingual, multiracial African American Japanese woman who has done lectures and performances everywhere from the United States to France, Morocco, Japan, Germany, England, South Africa, Senegal, India, Denmark, and beyond. Fukushima’s ‘RAPtivism’ work has been featured on Oprah Magazine, TEDx, KQED Public Television, The Seattle Times, TV 2M Morocco, The Bangalore Mirror, HYPE, South Africa’s #1 Hip Hop Magazine, and Tour highlights include performing for audiences of over 20,000 people in Nepal, speaking with the President of Estonia about the power of music to create change, and sharing stages with the likes of Bernie Sanders, Emory Douglas (Black Panthers), KRS-One, Herbie Hancock, Christian McBride, The Isley Brothers, and M1 (Dead Prez). 

As a public speaker, Fukushima combines the art of performance and lecture. In her speeches, she links themes such as hip hop, global citizenship, empowerment, feminism, and cultural activism with live musical performance. She was the first non-Native person to deliver a keynote address at Montana’s 2012 Schools of Promise Conference for Indigenous youth and has presented at such diverse venues as Stanford University, Yale Law School, Duke University, the National Conference On Race and Ethnicity (NCORE), People of Color in Independent Schools (POCIS) conferences, UMass Amherst, TEDxSitka, TEDxBend, TEDxWhitman, TEDxUWCCR, Rock The School Bells, Osaka University, among others.

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