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One World One Water Events

The following are some events you may be interested in. For the most up to date event announcements, follow the One World One Water Center on Facebook and Twitter.  

 

To apply for the Fall 2015 Water Diplomats Work Study opportunity, please complete the application: Water Diplomats Work Study Application 

 

"Remembering the 1965 South Platte Flood"
History Colorado Center
1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203
June 16, 2015
7pm

 

In June of 1965 heavy rains over four consecutive days in three areas of the South Platte basin caused flooding from Plum Creek south of Denver to the Nebraska state line. The flood devastated the South Platte valley and shaped the river’s future in Denver. Join Robert Glancy (National Weather Service), Matthew Kelsch (UCAR), Bryan Kohlenberg (Urban Drainage and Flood Control District), and Tom Browning (Colorado Water Conservation Board) as they discuss the science and impact of the 1965 flood.


"Water for a Growing City"
History Colorado Center
1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203
July 21, 2015
7pm

Before the people of Denver purchased the water distribution system in 1918, numerous private water companies served the city. Starting in the late 1880s, the base of Platte Cañon (now known at Waterton Canyon) became the location for water storage and a variety of water filtration methods. This presentation will discuss the early Denver water system, the different types of water filtration, and the development by Denver Union Water Company of the company town of Kassler in the early 1900s. Join staff from Denver Water to hear the history of how Denver focused on safe drinking water.

 

Fall Semester Begins
Auraria Campus
August 17th

"Water Stories of the LIving West Exhibit"
History Colorado Center
1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203
August 18, 2015
7pm

Join us for an informal evening in the History Colorado Center’s award-winning Living West exhibit. Meet the people behind the water stories and get up-close with artifacts featured in the exhibit—and find out why water is so important to our state’s history.

 

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