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Correspondence Courses

Self Paced Learning

MSU Denver Correspondence Program provides fully accredited college courses that offer a flexible and valuable alternative to traditional classroom and online schedules. Correspondence courses are offered in both Self-Paced Online and Print-Based formats which give students the freedom to:

  • Work independently through Blackboard or from a course study packet at your own pace.
  • Set your own schedule with no fixed assignment deadlines or class meeting times.
  • Register for courses mid-semester (does not apply to students receiving financial aid).
  • Finish a course in a few weeks or take up to 6 months to complete a self-paced online course, or 1 year to complete a print-based course.

Correspondence courses are appropriate for independent learners who can, or need to, set their own learning schedule.

Self-Paced Online (SPO) courses require computer access. All coursework, assessments, and communication with your instructor will be through the Blackboard Learning Management system. You may access your course through Blackboard Learn.

Students NOT receiving Federal Financial Aid who enroll in self-paced online correspondence courses have six (6) months to complete their course(s). All required coursework must be submitted in Blackboard Learn by the coursework completion deadline date. If you do not complete your SPO course by the posted deadline date you will receive an “F” as your final grade.

Students receiving Financial Aid must be enrolled in all classes (classroom, online, correspondence, etc.) by the posted census date, and complete all courses by the end of the semester of enrollment. Deadline dates specific to your semester of enrollment are posted on the MSU Denver Academic Calendar. It is your responsibility to know and comply with all regulations associated with your financial aid package. For questions regarding financial aid please contact the Office of Financial Aid at 303-556-4741.

SPO Registration and Completion Deadlines

Semester

Registration Deadline

Coursework Completion Deadline

Spring

Mar 15th

Sept 30th of the same year

Summer

July 15th

Nov 30th of the same year

Fall

Oct 15th

Apr 30th of the following year


Print-based courses require the purchase of a course study packet. All coursework will be submitted via the US Postal system unless your instructor notes otherwise. Communication with the instructor can be a combination of phone, email, or postal mail.

Your course study packet acts as your guide, specifying what the required lessons and assignments are for your course. If your correspondence course requires you to take tests, your study packet will specify when to take them.

Course study packets are available for purchase in digital format for a nominal fee at www.aurariacoursepacks.com.  The digital format offers tools for highlighting, taking and sharing notes, importing notes, searching packet content, and more. In addition to the interactive tools, your study packet can be accessed from tablet devices for convenient access anytime, anywhere.

Students NOT receiving Federal Financial Aid who enroll in print-based correspondence courses have four (4) consecutive semesters to complete their course(s). If you do not complete your correspondence course by the posted deadline date you will receive an “F” as your final grade.

Students receiving Financial Aid must be enrolled in all classes (classroom, online, correspondence, etc.) by the posted census date, and complete all courses by the end of the semester of enrollment. Deadline dates specific to your semester of enrollment are posted on the MSU Denver Academic Calendar.  It is your responsibility to know and comply with all regulations associated with your financial aid package. For questions regarding financial aid please contact the Office of Financial Aid at 303-556-4741.

Print-Based Registration and Completion Deadlines

Semester

Registration Deadline

Coursework Completion Deadline

Spring

Apr 15th

Apr 23rd of the following year

Summer

Jul 15th

Jul 17th of the following year

Fall

Nov 15th

Nov 27th of the following year


Registration

Registering for Correspondence Courses

You must be an MSU Denver student with a student ID to register for courses. For more information about the application process, or to apply online, please visit the website for the Office of Admissions.

MSU Denver students can register for correspondence courses through ConnectU. Simply select Self-Paced Online/Correspondence from the class schedule search options and enter the CRN for the course(s) you select. Please be sure to check the class notes to determine if the course is offered as self-paced online or in the print based format.

Colorado Consortium Student Registration

Students seeking to take MSU Denver correspondence courses as part of the Colorado Consortium program must complete the MSU Denver admissions application as a non-degree seeking student.  For more information about the application process, or to apply online, please visit the website for the Office of Admissions.

Once you are accepted and have received your student ID (900#), you may register for correspondence classes through ConnectU, or by calling the Correspondence Office at 303-450-5111.

Tuition and fees are billed to your student account and must be paid prior to starting the course(s). For instructions on how to pay your student account please go to the Tuition tab on this website.   

Consortium students are responsible for verifying that MSU Denver correspondence course(s) will transfer to your current college or university, and degree program if applicable.

For more information about MSU Denver Correspondence Program or to request a copy of a course syllabus for transfer approval purposes, please contact the Correspondence Office at 303-450-5111.


Tuition

Tuition for Correspondence courses is a flat per credit hour rate. MSU Denver mandatory fees are in addition to tuition. Tuition and fees are billed to your student account which can be paid through ConnectU, or by calling the Cashier’s Office at 303-556-4013. Course study packets and textbooks must be purchased separately.

Tuition and Fees for the 2014-2015 Academic Year:

Print-Based Courses                $174 per credit hour

Self-Paced Online Courses       $185 per credit hour

Mandatory Fees:

Matriculation Fee        $75.00 – (one-time fee per degree program)

Immunization Fee       $ 2.05

Metro Bond Fee          $20.35 per credit hour

 


Correspondence Course Descriptions

ANT 1310: Intro to Cultural Anthropology

Crosslisted: HON 1311 This course provides a comparative perspective on human cultural behavior and theory by exploring a variety of world cultures in the major domains of language, food-getting strategies, economics, marital and family systems, kinship, sex and gender, political organization and social control, social stratification, religion, and art. The applied aspects of anthropology are also investigated. Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ANT or HON. (General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II)

 GEL 1150: Oceanography

This introductory course studies the world’s oceans, including historical explorations, physical and biological processes, energy sources, ocean resources, marine provinces, and geology of ocean basins.  This course emphasizes global distribution, use and control of ocean resources and ocean pollution. (General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences)

 HCM 3010: Health Care Organization

This course analyzes the organizational structure of the health care system in the U.S. The nature of health and health care delivery is assessed. Emphasis is placed on the interrelatedness of cultural, economic, political, technological, and social aspects of health care delivery, along with its services and management. Disease origins and epidemiology are explored. 

 HCM 3600: Health Information Systems

This course is a general introduction to health care management information system, focusing on the role and importance of electronic communication and data transmission. Planning and change management in health care information technology are emphasized. The materials cover patient-centered technologies found in the health enterprise today.  

 HIS 3290: Nazi Germany and WWII

This detailed survey examines the origins of Hitler’s regime within the context of 20th century Germany and Nazi domestic and foreign policies to 1939. World War II, given thorough coverage, is viewed as the logical culmination of Hitler's ideology and his ability to use the German nation as a means to achieve his murderous ends.

 HIS 3360: Women in European History

Crosslisting: WMS 3360 - This course provides an historical analysis of the role and contribution made by women in the development of Western Civilization from Neolithic times to the present. Credit will be granted for only one prefix: HIS or WMS.

 HTE 2512: Hotel Front Office

This course examines hotel front-office procedures by detailing the flow of business through a hotel, from the reservations process to check-out and settlement. Students identify effective front-office management, with particular attention to the planning and evaluation of front office operations. Front-office procedures and management are placed within the context of the overall operation of the hotel.

 HTE 3522: Hotel Housekeeping

In this course, students learn how to manage housekeeping operations in the hotel industry. Students study the management of direct housekeeping day-to-day operations from the big picture perspective down to technical details. This course examines the interrelation of hotel departments, and maximum guest service and profitability. 

 HTE 4650: Hospitality Human Resources

In this course, students examine the human resources and management issues that are prevalent in the hotel, restaurant, tourism, and event industries.  Students learn to plan, organize, set goals and communicate effectively.  Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO), diversity, recruitment, and training are also covered in this course. 

JRN 1010: Introduction to Journalism & Mass Media

This survey course introduces students from all academic disciplines to the historical development of journalism and mass media and its relationship to contemporary society. Students will explore the functions and impact of newspapers, books, television, radio, magazines, films, public relations and issues such as technology convergence, censorship, economic control, and privacy. (General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I), (GT-SS3)

 SOC 1010: Introduction to Sociology

This course facilitates the development of a sociological perspective as it applies to understanding the social forces that shape people's lives, interests, and personalities. The emphasis is on the scientific study of people in groups, the importance of culture, the processes of socialization, social control and social conflict, and the major institutions of society. (General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I), (GT-SS3)

 SOC 3410: The Family in Transition

This course is designed to provide an in-depth sociological analysis of the family as a social institution in a changing society. Major theoretical perspectives will be incorporated to facilitate an understanding of significant social transitions, trends and issues of varying patterns of contemporary family life. Dimensions of the family are examined through interactive relationships including ethnicity, gender, age, and social class.   

SOC 3500: Criminology

This course is a sociological analysis of the nature, causes, and treatment of crime and delinquency and of the processes by which such persons and behaviors develop.

 SOC 3510: Juvenile Delinquency

This course emphasizes the universality and variability of misconduct and delinquencies of youth. In addition, the course examines the youth subculture, gangs, drug addiction, the juvenile justice system and the effects of child abuse. 

 SPA 1000: Spanish for Special Purposes—Travel

This course is designed for beginning students of Spanish and uses the video course Destin: An Introduction to Spanish.  Basic skills addressed include listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.  This course is conducted primarily in Spanish, using English to clarify essential points.

 WMS 3360: Women in European History

Crosslisting: HIS 3360 - This course provides an historical analysis of the role and contribution made by women in the development of Western Civilization from Neolithic times to the present. Credit will be granted for only one prefix: HIS or WMS.


AAS 1130: Survey of African History

Crosslisting: HIS 1940 - Surveys the major developments on the African continent from ancient times to the modern period.  The course focuses on political and cultural developments in African civilizations from ancient Egypt to the contemporary period.  Credit will be granted for one prefix only: AAS or HIS. (General Studies: Historical, Global Diversity), (GT-HI1)

ANT 3310: Ethnography of North American Indians

This course studies the nature and consequences of distinctive tribal cultures that occupied North America at the time of European contact. It will include a close analysis of the many different aspects of social organization and environment that made up the unique cultures we call American Indian. (Multicultural)

EDS 2680: Portfolio Development Workshop

The primary purpose of this class is to enable you to develop a prior learning portfolio that can be used to apply for academic credit for courses offered at MSU Denver.

HIS 1020: Western Civilization since 1603

Crosslisting: HON 1020 - This course traces the history of Western Civilization from 1603 to the present and covers the following topics: the old regime and revolutions, 19th century nationalism and liberalism, the crises of the 20th century, and the challenges of the 21st. Credit will be granted for one prefix only: HIS or HON. (General Studies: Historical, Global Diversity), (GT-HI1)

HIS 1040: World History since 1500

This course provides an introduction to important theories, concepts, methods and content for understanding world history since 1500. Among others, it explores social, cultural, religious, economic, and political themes. (General Studies: Historical, Global Diversity), (GT-HI1)

HIS 1940: Survey of African History

Crosslisting: AAS 1130 - Surveys the major developments on the African continent from ancient times to the modern period.  The course focuses on political and cultural developments in African civilizations from ancient Egypt to the contemporary period.  Credit will be granted for one prefix only: HIS or AAS. (General Studies: Historical, Global Diversity), (GT-HI1)

HIS 3090: Native Americans in History

The purpose of this course is to examine the history of the cultural contact and confrontation between North American indigenous people and Europeans and Africans from Celtic times to the present. The course seeks to integrate ethnohistoric evidence from "traditional" Eurocentric accounts to provide as balanced an account as possible. (Multicultural)

HIS 3250: World War I

This course presents a detailed examination of the First World War and the peace settlement that followed in 1919.  Emphasis is placed on the origins of the war in the years before 1914; the unique character of the trenches on the western front; the revolutionary impact of the war on the destruction of the European monarchies in Austria-Hungary, Russia and Germany; the rise of Fascism and Communism; and the failure of Woodrow Wilson’s League of nations vision and the Treaty of Versailles in preserving the peace.

HIS 340B: Biography as History: Western Heroes and Villains

Examine the lives, personalities, and historical importance of some of the West’s most colorful characters.  From the Spanish explorations through the early 20th century, each significant era of the West’s lively past is examined through the eyes of approximately 30 of the region’s most important figures.  Emphasis is on the lively aspects of each personality, as well as their importance in shaping the destiny of the West.

HIS 340D: Biography as History: Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt

This course will focus on the distinctive background experiences that shaped the adult life of these three unusual historic leaders.  The course will also explore the manner in which distinctive national characteristics and unique histories shaped the perceptions and reactions of each of these leaders.  The class will also explore the interactions of these three men with each other during World War II.

HIS 3430: American Revolution and Early National Period, 1763-1848

This course examines politics, society, and economics during the Revolutionary period.  Major topics will include American Society on the eve of the Revolution, the causes of the war and military and diplomatic aspects of the eras, development of political parties, reform movements and changing status of native and Africa Americans and women.

HIS 3520: Civil War and Reconstruction

This course traces the background of the Civil War, the war itself, and the aftermathematics of the war. It also familiarizes students with Civil War and Reconstruction historiography. 

HIS 367C: The Cold War

This course examines the Cold War from 1917 to 1991.  Emphasis is placed on the events preceding the confrontation from the Russian Revolution of 1917 through World War II; the impact of the atomic bomb; Soviet occupation of Eastern Europe; The Truman Doctrine and Containment; domestic policies in both countries, the Cuban Missile Crisis; Détente and contributions of Gorbachev to the ending of the Cold War and the USSR.

HIS 4650: World War II, 1939-1948

This is a detailed examination of World War II and the early years of the Cold War.  Emphasis is placed on the war in Europe, the impact of Nazi rule, diplomacy among the wartime allies, the collapse of wartime cooperation, the advent of the Cold War, as well as containment.

WMS 1001: Introduction to Women’s Studies

This course introduces the discipline of women's studies, the historical development of feminist thought, the intersectionality of identities, including gender, race, class, and sexual orientation, and the social, economic, and technological factors that have led to changing roles for women throughout the world. The course also focuses analysis on gender, race and class, including experiences of women of color. (General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I), (GT-SS3)

WMS 3910: Women’s Spirituality

This course will explore the philosophical basis for and nature of women’s spirituality. Political, social, and cultural aspects of the women’s spirituality movement will be analyzed both within and beyond traditional institutionalized religion; facets of women’s individual spiritual growth and development express themselves in a variety of ways, and this course seeks to examine emotional, cognitive, somatic, and physical aspects. Students will also have the opportunities to participate in the art, music, and rituals associated with various traditions and to create projects that will illuminate their personal experiences.


Applicability of correspondence courses to majors may vary with departments.  Please contact your major department before registering if you intend a correspondence course to fulfill a major requirement.

Independent Study

Metropolitan State University of Denver is a member of the Colorado Consortium for Independent Study. The Consortium includes eleven colleges and universities in Colorado, offering a variety of courses through independent study.

For More Information:

Other Distance Learning Opportunities offered at MSU Denver: